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Curtiss P-36A Hawk

UNITED STATES ARMY AIR CORPS 18th PG

"Gold Bug"

Ken Walker Group Commander

Wheeler Field

Pearl Harbor Hawaii

 December 7th 1941

Limited Edition

$41.98

Carousel 1 Aircraft

Features :

  • Die-cast metal construction with some plastic components.

  • Realistic panel lines, antennas, access panels and surface details.

  • Pad printed markings and placards that won't fade or peel like decals.

  • Optional extended/retracted metal landing gear with rotating wheels and rubber tires.

  • Extremely detailed cockpit interiors with glazed instruments.

  • Detailed removable pilot figures.

  • Spinning metal propellers.

  • Accurately detailed underside with concealed screwheads.

General Kenneth Walker was one of the men who prepared an under-equipped US Army Air Corps for war during the 1930's and early 1940's. Walker enlisted in 1917 and gained his wings and a commission in 1918. He served in Texas, Oklahoma, the Philippines, Virginia, Alabama, and Kansas before promotion to major in 1933. As a bombardment instructor at the Air Corps Tactical School at Maxwell Field, Alabama, Walker developed and articulated dynamic bombing tactics and techniques that would be implemented in WW2 and continue to influence the US Air Force in the 21st century. He was posted to Hawaii in 1938, where he served as Commanding Officer of the 18th Pursuit Group, based at Wheeler Field on the island of Oahu. As Group CO, Walker trimmed his P-36 with metallic gold paint, and he dubbed the plane, "Goldbug." The yellow, blue, and red stripes designated the squadrons which constituted the group. He returned to Washington, D.C. in January 1941 and participated in the creation of the HQ Army Air Force in July 1941, with the rank of colonel. His plans for organizing wartime bombing against Germany and Japan were approved and implemented by General Hap Arnold and President Franklin Roosevelt. Walker's influence on Air Force war planning was tremendous and completely out of proportion to his rank. He was promoted to Brigadier General in June, 1942, before being sent to the south Pacific to direct the 5th Bomber Command. Walker was the kind of general who led from the front, experiencing the same risks as the men he commanded. He flew the low altitude missions he had planned in B-17's and B-25's. General George Kenney, Walker's commander, ordered him to cease flying combat missions. But, on 5 January 1943 Walker disobeyed orders to lead an unescorted formation of twelve B-17's in an low level daylight attack on Japanese shipping at Rabaul-the most heavily defended target in the Pacific. Some of the participants expressed the opinion that this was a suicide mission, but only two planes failed return, one of them Walker's. He and his crew were missing in action. His son Kenneth, Jr., received his father's Medal of Honor from President Roosevelt on 25 March 1943. Kenneth Walker's remains were never recovered, and there was no memorial to him until one was dedicated to him at Arlington on 7 December 2006.

Shipping $8.95 in the Continental USA

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UNITED STATES

ARMY AIR CORPS

27TH PURSUIT SQUADRON

15TH PURSUIT GROUP

P-36C HAWK

CLEVELAND NATIONAL AIR RACES

SEPTEMBER 1939

Major Willis TAYLOR

Squadron Commander

Limited Edition

$49.98

Carousel 1 Aircraft

Features :

  • Die-cast metal construction with some plastic components.

  • Realistic panel lines, antennas, access panels and surface details.

  • Pad printed markings and placards that won't fade or peel like decals.

  • Optional extended/retracted metal landing gear with rotating wheels and rubber tires.

  • Extremely detailed cockpit interiors with glazed instruments.

  • Detailed removable pilot figures.

  • Spinning metal propellers.

  • Accurately detailed underside with concealed screwheads.

The 27th Fighter Squadron "Fighting Eagles" is the oldest in the US Air Force, formed in 1917. It claims Frank Luke, who was posthumously awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor during WW1. During the 1930's, the 27th Pursuit Squadron was the premier pursuit unit in the Army Air Corps, serving the same sort of role as the modern "Thunderbirds" alongside normal duties. Beginning in 1929, the Cleveland National Air Races had become the most prestigious aviation event in the world, with single-day crowds exceeding 100,000. In 1939, the 27th converted to the P-36, the hottest plane in the American arsenal, and was selected to represent the Army Air Corps at Cleveland. Based at Michigan's Selfridge Field, the squadron focused on preparation and practice for this event. Major Willis Taylor, commanding officer of the 27th, is credited with the idea of painting the squadron's P-36's in a variety of camouflage patterns without national insignia, using the new water-based camouflage paint colors. Crew chiefs were encouraged to use their imaginations devising patterns, and none of the squadron's P-36's used the same scheme, although colors were shared. Colors included sand, dark green, light gray, dark blue, dark olive drab, and neutral gray, most aircraft using three or four colors. Faded or over-exposed color photos of these planes have been published in which light gray looks white and sand appears orange. The significance of the frog emblem on Taylor's left hand wing "bucket" for shell casings is a mystery. At the time, American military aircraft were painted in bright colors and the eighteen camouflaged P-36's created a sensation at Cleveland. Major Taylor was less familiar with the aerial routines, because he had been posted to Air Corps Tactical School at Maxwell Field, Alabama during the summer. During the 1 September 1939 performance, he turned the wrong way at the bottom of a dive over the grandstand, nearly causing a catastrophic collision. But public attention was distracted by the much larger aviation demonstration that the German Luftwaffe staged over Poland earlier that day. The Cleveland Air Races were finished after 1949, when a P-51 stalled and crashed into a nearby house, killing a mother and child-the first non-participant fatalities. The 27th Fighter Squadron was the first to convert to P-38's and served with distinction in the Mediterranean theater during WW2. Recently, the 27th was the first squadron to convert to the F-22.

Shipping $8.95 in the Continental USA

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Fokker Dr.1 Triplane

Luftstreitkrafte Jasta 4

Ernst Udet,Somme France

1918

Limited Edition

Carousel 1 Aircraft

Features :

  • Die-cast metal construction with some plastic components.

  • Realistic panel lines, antennas, access panels and surface details.

  • Pad printed markings and placards that won't fade or peel like decals.

  • Metal landing gear with rotating wheels and rubber tires.

  • Extremely detailed cockpit interiors with glazed instruments.

  • Detailed removable pilot figures.

  • Free Spinning metal and wood look highly detailed and accurate propellers.

  • Accurately detailed underside with concealed screwheads.

$59.98

Ernst Udet enlisted in the German army as a motorcyclist in 1914 at age eighteen, and transferred to the air service after breaking a shoulder. He served as an enlisted man on ground service, while his father paid for private flying lessons. Udet talked his way into piloting first two-seaters, then fighters, despite difficulties and crashes. He froze on his first combat encounter as a fighter pilot in January 1916, but escaped with minor injuries. Udet's first victory came on 18 March 1916. He was commissioned in January 1917, and by the end of 1917 his tally stood at 21. He commanded Jagstaffel or Jasta (Hunting Flight) 37 before being selected to fly with Manfred von Richthofen in Jasta 11 of Jagd Geschwader (Hunting Group) 1. Four Jastas-4, 6, 10, and 11-made up the Group. The place of greatest honor was Jasta 11, alongside the Red Baron. Here Udet scored number 23 on 6 April 1918, before taking leave with a serious ear infection requiring treatment. While at home in Munich, he became engaged, received notice via telegram of being awarded the Pour le Mérite (Blue Max), and read the shocking news that Richthofen had been killed.

Shipping $8.95 in the Continental USA

  Flyboys Movie Diecast Airplanes  

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French NIEUPORT 17

Eugene Skinner 

Lafayette Escadrille

Flyboys Movie

Limited Edition

 

 

 

$26.98

Limited Edition of 600

Movie Pilot Eugene Skinner is based on real American hero Eugene Bullard, originally a boxer, the first black aviator and a successful French Combat Pilot. Skinner's personal insignia is a pair of boxing gloves.

Shipping $8.95 in the Continental USA
  • Assembled Die-cast Model

  • Authentic Shapes & Details

  • Authentic Markings of Movie Airplanes

  • Nieuport wingspan is 6-1/8"/155mm

  • Pilot Figures in Cockpit

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Nieuport Nieuport 17

Lafayette Escadrille

Blaine Rawlings

Flyboys Movie

Limited Edition

$26.98

Limited Edition of 600

The real Lafayette Escadrille flew silver Nieuport 17's with a Seminole chief insignia, as portrayed in the movie. In France, Rawlings, and Eugene Skinner, and other American volunteers are trained to fly before being sent into combat for the Lafayette Escadrille under veteran Reed Cassidy during World War One.

Their chief adversaries are German pilots flying Fokker Triplanes, led by the black airplane of the BLACK FALCON and the red CROSSED SWORDS.

Shipping $8.95 in the Continental USA
  • Assembled Diecast Model

  • Authentic Shapes & Details

  • Authentic Markings of Movie Airplanes

  • Nieuport wingspan is 6-1/8"/155mm

  • Pilot Figures

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Curtiss P-40B

USAAF

Pearl Harbor 1941

Pilot George Welch

39.98

1:48 Scale

Shipping $8.95 in the Continental USA
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Grumman F4F-3 Wildcat

Pilot Charlie Shields

U.S. Navy 1940 

39.98

1:48 Scale

Shipping $8.95 in the Continental USA
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Switzerland International

Flying Meet

39.98

1:48 Scale

Ernst Udet joined JG1 “Richthofen’s Flying Circus” in 1917 and served under Manfred von Richthofen later, Hermann Goering. Udet was awarded the ‘Blue Max’ and was the top German ace to survive the First World War. With charisma , daring, and a keen sense of humor , Udet promoted himself into an international celebrity in the world of aviation. He made three successful mountain/aviation movies in Germany with Leni Riefenstahl. He traveled widely and flew camera planes for German expeditions into Africa and Arctic. Udet made friends with several WWI adversaries , including Eddie Rickenbacker, Bert Hall, Billy Bishop, and Rene Fonck. Udet competed at the 1931 National Cleveland Air Races at Cleveland and was friendly with aviation personalities like Roscoe Turner and Hollywood stars like Harold Lloyd. Wherever there were beautiful women and champagne, the happy – go-lucky Udet was welcome. In 1934 the Nazis were in power and Goering persuaded Udet to head the technical office of the new Luftwaffe. Udet was unsuitable for bureaucracy or ruthless intrigues among men he had befriended like Goering and Erhard Milch. Udet’s role in promoting the Ju 87 Stuka is well known, but he also chose the Messerschmitt 109 for production, earning the enmity of his then-deputy Milch, who hated Willy Messerschmitt. Geneva was the biggest aviation event in Europe, and Germany planned to dominate it in 1937. Udet was to fly the 1560-hp Bf 109 V-14. The German team easily defeated their competition, but in the big race, Alpenrunflug Kategorie A : Einsitzer on 27 July 1937, Udet’s V-14 crashed heavily with a cracked oil line. The fuselage broke in half just behind the cockpit but he suffered only minor injuries. He continued his work to build the Luftwaffe, promoting new types like the Fw 190 , Me 163 and Me 262 against the opposition of Milch, who made him the scapegoat for Luftwaffe failure in the Battle of Britain. In August 1941 Udet tried to resign but Goering refused. Reportedly Udet became depressed and shot himself on 17 November 1941. But some blamed Milch, claiming Ernst Udet loved life too much to kill himself and arranged “suicides” were a popular Nazi method of eliminating those with too much prestige to be challenged publicly or executed.
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Focke-Wulf Fw 190D JV 44

"Red 4" Karl-Heinz Hofmann

Luftwaffe May 1945

39.98

1:48 Scale

In July 1944 Germany introduced the Messerschmitt Me 262, the first jet aircraft in combat. Allied pilots were astonished by its speed – 100mph faster than the best Allied fighters- and quick to find its weakness-it was vulnerable at take-off and particularly at landing. So the Luftwaffe arranged for conventional fighters to cover the jets over their air bases, and Soviet Aircraft. Adolf Galland was dismissed from his position as General of Fighters because Germany was overwhelmed by Allied air attacks and Reichsmarchall Hermann Goring needed a scapegoat. In February 1945, Goring authorized Galland to form a Jagdverband (Special Fighter Squadron) of experienced pilots to fly the Me 262. Retraining took time, and they did not become operational until 5 April, 1945. Galland recruited Leutnant Heinz Sachsenberg (104 victories) from Jagd Geschwader (Hunting Wing0 26, to lead a Platzschutzstaffel (Airfield Defense Flight). Four Fw190D’s were acquired: three D-9’s and one D-11. They painted these airplanes red underneath with white stripes on the undersides of the wings, horizontal tail planes and forward fuselage to prevent German flak from confusing their ‘Doras’ with American Mustangs. When jets took off and landed, the 190D’s were to circle the vicinity of the Munich-Reim airfield at an altitude of 500 meters and never to pursue Allied fighters. They used the radio call signal Pagagei (Parrot), but this was not a name for their unit. Sachsenberg flew “Red 1”, Hptm. Waldemar Wubke flew “Red 3” and Oblt. Klaus Faber flew “Red 13” , (all D-9s). Lt. Karl-Heinz Hofmann flew “Red 4’ a D-11. Previously this Dora-11 aircraft was thought a prototype, but the latest information confirms that it was a production aircraft with standard two-tone green camouflage. Hofmann was one of the few members of JV 44 Doras bore slogans, and Hofmann’s was “ Der Nachste Herr deiselbe Dame!” ( The next Guy same Dame!) His rare Dora-11 had 30mm cannons mounted outboard of the landing gear instead of the cannons in the wing roots). Although the D-11 had much greater firepower, outboard cannons were prone to jam, and many pilots preferred the D-9’s concentrated firing pattern

   

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