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Fun and informative information on real Military Aircraft - Updated Daily with New Airplanes and Information

  Picture and Information Nellis Air Show Pictures 20009 - 2010
  Lockheed Martin F-22 Raptor

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The Lockheed Martin/Boeing F-22 Raptor is a single-seat, twin-engine fifth-generation super-maneuverable fighter aircraft that uses stealth technology. The F-22 engines produce more thrust than any current fighter engine. The combination of sleek aerodynamic design and increased thrust allows the F-22 to cruise at supersonic airspeeds (greater than 1.5 Mach) without using afterburner -- a characteristic known as supercruise. Supercruise greatly expands the F-22 's operating envelope in both speed and range over current fighters, which must use fuel-consuming afterburner to operate at supersonic speeds. The sophisticated F-22 aerodesign, advanced flight controls, thrust vectoring, and high thrust-to-weight ratio provide the capability to outmaneuver all current and projected aircraft. The F-22 design has been extensively tested and refined aerodynamically during the development process. This is one amazing Fighter Aircraft.

  North American AT-6

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The North American Aviation has in its archives an ordinary sheet of paper with handwritten numbers and a few hand-drawn diagrams vaguely resembling parts of an aircraft scrawled across it and dated dec. 10 1934. On that sheet, over a cup of coffee, J.H. "Dutch" Kendelberger, J.L. Atwood and H.R. Raynor sketched out what North American would come to call the "NA-16". Granddaddy of one of the greatest aircraft of all time - the T-6 "Texan". The T-6 is known by a variety of names; the "Texan" by the US Air Force and US Navy, the "Harvard" by our British and Canadian allies, and the "Wirraway" by the Aussies. There was never a better aircraft built for training fighter pilots. North American Aviation T-6 Texan was a single-engine advanced trainer aircraft used to train pilots of the United States Army Air Forces, United States Navy, Royal Air Force and other air forces of the British Commonwealth during World War II and into the 1950s. Designed by North American Aviation, the T-6 is known by a variety of designations depending on the model and operating air force. The USAAC designated it as the AT-6, the United States Navy the SNJ, and British Commonwealth air forces, the Harvard, the name it is best known by outside of the US. It remains a popular warbird aircraft.

  F-16 Fighting Falcon

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The Famous F-16 Fighting Falcon is a compact, multi-role fighter aircraft. It is highly maneuverable and has proven itself in air-to-air combat and air-to-surface attack. It provides a relatively low-cost, high-performance weapon system for the United States and allied nations. In an air combat role, the F-16's maneuverability and combat radius (distance it can fly to enter air combat, stay, fight and return) exceed that of all potential threat fighter aircraft. It can locate targets in all weather conditions and detect low flying aircraft in radar ground clutter. In an air-to-surface role, the F-16 can fly more than 500 miles (860 kilometers), deliver its weapons with superior accuracy, defend itself against enemy aircraft, and return to its starting point. The all-weather capability allows it to accurately deliver ordnance during non-visual bombing conditions. In designing the F-16, advanced aerospace science and proven reliable systems from other aircraft such as the F-15 and F-111 were selected. These were combined to simplify the airplane and reduce its size, purchase price, maintenance costs and weight. The light weight of the fuselage is achieved without reducing its strength. With a full load of internal fuel, the F-16 can withstand up to nine G's -- nine times the force of gravity -- which exceeds the capability of most other current fighter aircraft.

  USAAF P-47 Thunderbolt

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Republic Aviation's P-47 Thunderbolt, also known as the "Jug", was the largest, heaviest, and most expensive fighter aircraft in history to be powered by a single piston engine. Also known as the "Jug" (because either it was shaped like a squatted milk jug, or it was short for "juggernaut"), was the largest, heaviest, and most expensive fighter aircraft in history to be powered by a single piston engine.[2] It was heavily armed with eight .50-caliber machine guns, four per wing. When fully loaded, the P-47 weighed up to eight tons, and in the fighter-bomber ground attack roles could carry five inch rockets or a significant bomb load of 2,500 pounds; over half the weight the B-17 bomber could carry on long-range missions. The P-47, based on the powerful Pratt & Whitney R-2800 Double Wasp engine, was to be very effective as a short-to-medium range escort fighter in high-altitude air-to-air combat and when unleashed as a fighter-bomber, proved especially adept at ground attack in both the World War II European and Pacific Theaters.

 
Douglas SBD Dauntless

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The Douglas SBD Dauntless was a naval dive bomber made by Douglas during World War II. The SBD was the United States Navy's main dive bomber from mid-1940 until late 1943, when it was largely replaced by the SB2C Helldiver. . The aircraft was also operated by the United States Army as the A-24 Banshee. The Northrop BT-1 provided the basis for the SBD, which began manufacture in 1940. Ed Heinemann led a team of designers who considered a development with a 1,000 hp (750 kW) Wright Cyclone powerplant. A year earlier, both the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps had placed orders for the new dive bombers, designated the SBD-1 and SBD-2 (the latter had increased fuel capacity and different armament). The SBD-1 went to the Marine Corps in late 1940, and the SBD-2 went to the Navy in early 1941. The next version, designated SBD-3, began manufacture in early 1941. It provided increased armor, self-sealing fuel tanks, and four machine guns. The SBD-4 provided a 12 volt (from 6) electrical system, and a few were converted into SBD-4P reconnaissance platforms.

  Eurofighter Typhoon

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The first flight of the prototype Eurofighter Typhoon took place on March 27, 1994, when Messerchmitt-Bülkow-Blohm (MBB) chief test pilot Peter Weger took the prototype on a test flight around Bavaria. The basic configuration is reminiscent of the British Aerospace (BAe) EAP agile combat aircraft demonstrator, which flew back in August, 1986. In fact, the EAP was used to test many Eurofighter systems before final configuration of the latter plane was decided. (The relationship is similar to the F-17 and F/A-18, where the basic planform is the same but many design changes were made.) The EuroFighter, formerly known as the EF2000, is built by a consortium made up of BAe (UK), MBB and Dornier (Germany), Aeritalia (Italy), and CASA (Spain). It was initially designed for air-superiority and air defense roles, but a changing world situation has also resulted in an emphasis on excellent air-to-surface capabilities as well. The STOL (Short Take-Off and Landing) aircraft has a fundamentally unstable aerodynamic design; while this requires computer assistance for stable flight, gives the Eurofighter superior agility.much and doesn't have the EF2000's air-to-surface capability.

 

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The Hawk originates from a 1964 requirement for a new RAF trainer to replace the Gnat. The two-seat Jaguar was initially intended for this role, but it was soon realised that this would be far from ideal. Accordingly, in 1968 Hawker Siddeley Aviation began the design of a much simpler strictly subsonic trainer, which it designated P.1182 (later HS.1182). The stepped cockpit, allowing the instructor in the rear seat a good forward view, was an innovation subsequently adopted by many other training aircraft.
Confidence in the design was such that no prototypes or pre-production aircraft were ordered, the first six production aircraft being used for development testing. Five of these aircraft were later delivered to the RAF. After entering RAF service in April 1976, the Hawk replaced the Gnat and Hunter in the advanced training and weapons training roles respectively. The most famous RAF operator being the 'Red Arrows' aerobatic team.

 

Originally built to a US Navy specification the McDonnell Douglas F-4 Phantom was quickly adopted by the USAF and Marine Corp and became one of the mainstay aircraft in several airforces around the world including Great Britain's RAF and Germany's airforce. Capable of pushing mach 2 at altitude on it's twin engines this high performance aircraft had an operational ceiling of over 70,000 ft depending on the version and could carry up to 8 AAMs or 16,000 lb ordnance externally.

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The Amazing C-130 Hercules, primarily performs the intra-theater portion of the airlift mission. The aircraft is capable of operating from rough, dirt strips and is the prime transport for para-dropping troops and equipment into hostile areas. Basic and specialized versions perform a diversity of roles, including airlift support, DEW Line and Arctic ice re-supply, aero-medical missions, aerial spray missions, fire-fighting duties for the US Forest Service, and natural disaster relief missions. In recent years, they have been used to bring humanitarian relief to many countries, including Haiti, Bosnia, Somalia, and Rwanda. Four decades have elapsed since the Air Force issued its original design specification, yet the remarkable C-130 remains in production. The turbo-prop, high-wing, versatile "Hercules" has accumulated over 20 million flight hours. It is the preferred transport aircraft for many US Government services and over 60 foreign countries. The basic airframe has been modified to hundreds of different configurations to meet an ever-changing environment and mission requirement. The C-130 operates throughout the U.S. Air Force, serving with Air Mobility Command (stateside based), Air Force Special Operations Command, theater commands, Air National Guard and the Air Force Reserve Command, fulfilling a wide range of operational missions in both peace and war situations.

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The P-51 was one of the greatest single seat fighters to be used in WWII. Its original design called for the use of a 1,100 hp Allison V-1710-39 engine, but this version proved to have limitations in combat operations at higher altitudes. When the Allison was replaced by the British Rolls Royce Merlin engine the Mustang leapt into prominence as an excellent fighter. Its ability to fly long distances in the escort fighter role earned it fame during the long missions to Germany and over the expanses of the Pacific.

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Type: Fighter, Crew: 1, Pilot Armament: six.50 cal machine guns Specifications: Length: 32' 3" (9.80 m) Height: 13' 8" (4.17 m) Wing span: 37' (11.30 m) Wing area: 235 sq. ft (21.80 sq. m) Empty Weight: 7000 lbs (3175 kg) Gross Weight: 9200 lbs (4173 kg) Max Weight: 12100 lbs (5487 kg) Propulsion: Rolls Royce (Packard) Merlin V-1650 Horsepower: 1650 hp Performance: Range: 1000 miles (1610 km) Cruise Speed: 275 mph (442 km/hr) Max Speed: 437 mph (703 km/hr) Ceiling: 41900 ft (12770 m)

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The B-25 was a very versatile medium bomber that was used on all fronts. An example of its versatility can be seen in its use by Jimmy Doolittle, who led a raiding group of B-25s off of the deck of the carrier Hornet to bomb the Japanese home islands in April 1942. Armament continually changed during the evolution of the B-25, from the B model with a glass nose and a single fifty caliber machine gun, to the G model that carried a 75mm cannon in the nose, to the later version of the J model that had a solid nose with eight .50 calibers. The USAAF was not the only service to use the B-25. Over 700 Mitchells were delivered to the U.S. Navy and Marines, under the designation PBJ.   Many Allied nations also used the B-25, some continuing in use until the 1960's.

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Type: five-seat medium bomber, Crew: 5,  Armament: two to eighteen .50 cal machine guns up to 3,000 lbs. of bombs B-Model Specifications: Length: 52' 11" (16.13 m) Height: 15' 9" (4.80 m) Wingspan: 67' 7" (20.60 m) Gross Weight: 28460 lb B-Model Propulsion: No. of Engines: 2 Power-plant: Wright R-2600 Horsepower: 1700 each B-Model Performance: Range: 1200 miles (1932 km) Cruise Speed: 230 mph (370 km/h) Max Speed: 275 mph (442 km/h) Ceiling: 25000 ft (7619.6 m)

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The twin-tailed Lightning was a revolutionary design for a long range interceptor fighter. It served in all theaters of war, and was the main aircraft of many of America's top aces in the Pacific theater. Major Richard Bong scored his 40 kills flying P-38s in the Pacific. P-38s were also used in the famous mission that intercepted and shot down Japanese admiral Isoroku Yamamoto over Bougainville. The P-38's high speed and large nose section (which was a good location for recon cameras)  made the plane a natural for photographic reconnaissance missions. P-38s that were used in this role were re-designated as F-4s and F-5s.

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Type: Fighter Crew: 1, Pilot Armament: one 20mm cannon, four .50 cal machine guns Specifications: Length: 37' 10" (11.53 m) Height: 12' 10" (3.91 m) Wingspan: 52' 0" (15.85 m) Wing area: 328 sq. ft (30.47 sq. m) Empty Weight: 11780 lbs (5342 kg) Gross Weight: 14456 lbs (6556 kg) Max Weight: 15500 lbs (7029 kg) Propulsion: No. of Engines: 2 Power-plant: Allison V-1710-27/29 Horsepower 1150 hp each Performance: Range: 500 miles (805 km) Cruise Speed: 300 mph (483 km/hr) Max Speed: 390 mph (628 km/hr) Climb: 2500 ft/min (761.96 m/min) Ceiling: 39000 ft (11887 m)

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Known as the most outstanding carrier-based fighter to be used operationally in WWII, the Corsair has become legendary. Known to the Japanese as "Whistling Death", the Corsair was famous for its bent gull-wings and its high kill ratios. The Corsair was the first U.S. single-engined fighter to exceed 400 m.p.h., and had much better performance than the F4F Wildcat, which was the current top-of-the-line Navy fighter when the Corsair was introduced. Unfortunately, due to its very long nose (which limited pilot visibility, especially during take-offs and landings), it was believed by the Navy high command to be unsuitable for carrier operations. Typically, when the Navy had an aircraft that it did not want, it gave them to the Marines. This is what happened to the Corsairs, as they were restricted to land bases. Pappy Boyington and his Black Sheep Squadron was one of many who used the Corsair's abilities to its fullest. Later in the war it was proven that the Corsairs could operate safely off of carriers, and the "bent-wing birds" were used very successfully in helping to thwart the kamikaze raids in the war's final months. Demand for the Corsairs was such that they were also produced by Brewster and Goodyear.

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Type: Fighter Crew: 1, Pilot Armament: six .50 cal machine guns Specifications: Length: 33' 8" (10.26 m) Height: 14' 9" (4.50 m) Wingspan: 41' (12.5 m) Empty Weight: 9205 lbs (4174 kg) Gross Weight: 14669 lbs (6653 kg) Max Weight: 14670 lbs (6653 kg) Propulsion: No. of Engines: 1 Power-plant: Pratt & Whitney R-2800-18W Horsepower 2100 hp Performance: Range: 1005 miles (1618 km) Max Speed: 446 mph (718 km/hr) Climb: 3870 ft/min (1179.52 m/min) Ceiling: 41500 ft (12649 m)

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Focke-Wulf FW-190, Used by the German Luftwaffe in WWII. When it appeared on September 1941 over the British Channel, British Pilots realized this fighter would surpass them easily in performance and capability. The FW-190 was one of the best fighters to appear in the early years of WWII. It was small, very maneuverable and heavy on weapons and fast.

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Type: Fighter Crew: 1, Specifications: Length: 27'9" (10.26 m) Height: 10'1" Wingspan: 34'5" Empty Weight: 7704 lbs Gross Weight: 14669 lbs Max Weight: 10817 lbs Propulsion: No. of Engines: 1 Power-plant: BMW 810 18 cylinder Horsepower 1700 hp Performance: Range: 410 miles (1618 km) Max Speed: 416 mph Ceiling: 34868 ft

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The "Bf 109" had many revolutionary technical innovations. The "Taifin" had retractable flaps on the front of the wings, landing flaps and a retractable landing gear.

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Type: Fighter: Crew: 1, Pilot  : 2 x 7,9 mm MG 17 (above the engine)
1 x 20 mm MG 151/20 (firing through the spinner) Specifications: Length: 29' 3" (8.94 m) Height: 8' (2.59 m) Wingspan: 32'5" (9.92 m) Gross Weight: 7000 lb (3175 kg) Propulsion: No. of Engines: 1 Power-plant: Daimler-Benz 601 E : 1350 hp Performance: Range: 315 miles (580 km) Cruise Speed: 173 mph (278 km/h) Max Speed: 250 mph (402 km/h) Climb: 1700 ft/min (518 m/min) Ceiling: 37000 ft (11,500 m)

 
 

The F-15 Eagle has a perfect combat record of 101 victories and zero defeats. F-15s downed four Mig-29 fighters during the recent Balkan conflict and 33 of the 35 fixed-wing aircraft Iraq lost in air combat during Operation Desert Storm. During the Balkan conflict, the F-15E was the only fighter able to attack ground targets around the clock, in all weather conditions. The E, which will be in the USAF inventory well into the 21st century, is the latest F-15 produced by Boeing workers in St. Louis. It is the world's leading dual-role fighter, performing air-to-ground and air-to-air missions with unmatched success. Boeing has assembled 226 F-15Es for USAF as of July 2000, and is working on additional aircraft. 

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Power plant: Two Pratt & Whitney F100-PW-220 or 229 turbofan engines with afterburners, Thrust: 25,000 - 29,000 pounds each engine, Wingspan: 42.8 feet (13 meters), Length: 63.8 feet (19.44 meters), Height: 18.5 feet (5.6 meters)
Speed: Mach 2.5 plus, Maximum takeoff weight: 81,000 pounds (36,450 kilograms)
Service ceiling: 50,000 feet (15,000 meters), Combat ceiling: 35,000 feet (10,500 meters)
Range: 2,400 miles (3,840 kilometers) ferry range with conformal fuel tanks and three external fuel tanks, Armament: One 20mm multibarrel gun mounted internally with 500 rounds of ammunition. Four AIM-7F/M Sparrow missiles and four AIM-9L/M Sidewinder missiles, or eight AIM-120 AMRAAM missiles. Any air-to-surface weapon in the Air Force inventory (nuclear and conventional), Crew: Pilot and weapon systems officer

 
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